Architecture, El Verano, History, mid-century, Resorts, Uncategorized

Rozario’s

Rozarios’ resort, the successor to Parente’s Villa, was located on Verano Avenue between the Highway and the bridge.

Louis Parente, a notorious bar owner, fight promoter and would-be politician, came to El Verano in 1906 from San Francisco. (Please see Jeff Elliot’s great santarosahistory.com for much more on Parente: http://santarosahistory.com/wordpress/2016/07/the-village-of-vice-in-the-valley-of-the-moon/

By 1925 he had built a “new” hotel.

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According to the Index Tribune, “The 43 room hotel, hut, cottages and grounds were purchased by the Rozarios in 1943, and it was on January 1, 1944 that they opened it for business. The former San Francisco and Marin county residents had purchased the property from Joe Parente [actually Louis Parente], colorful Bay Area sports figure who brought many prize fighters here to train.”

Rozario’s was popular through the 1950s for wedding receptions, fashion shows, and formal dinners.

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The Rozarios sold the resort to Carl Innskeep and Joe La Rango in 1955.

It later became known as the El Verano Inn.ElVeranoInnweb

The buildings were torn down in 1985 to make way for an extension of the Finnish American Home Association’s housing complex for retired people, which was located behind the old resort building. In that year, the editor of the FAHA Manor News explained in a letter to the editor of the Index Tribune that FAHA wanted to preserve the building, but “could not afford the very expensive improvements necessary…” Thus we lost another piece of our history.RozariosTornDown1985clip

 

 

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Boyes Hot Springs, History, Photographs, Trees, Uncategorized

The Fairmont Employee Parking Lot

The site at the corner of Vallejo and Highway 12, now in use as the employee parking lot for the Sonoma Mission Inn, has a long history.

This postcard, post marked 1913, shows the entry arch, to Woodleaf Park (in the middle of the lot),  which was one of the early subdivisions in Boyes Hot Springs. The sign at left reads “Desirable Summer and Winter Cottages for rent. J. W. Minges.” Minges was a prominent land owner and businessman in early twentieth century Boyes Hot Springs and was often referred to as the “mayor” of Boyes Springs.

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This is part of a full page ad (above) from 1925 promoting Boyes Hot Springs. It reads, in part, “In place of the frame building and barber shop that was located next to the original post Office at Boyes, the enterprising business man (Bob Liaros) let the contract for a handsome hollow-tile building with concrete floors and fireproof throughout.”

The view from the 1930s (below) shows the building mentioned above.  Lairos was another Boyes booster and long-time business owner. Beyond the Liaros building are the ice plant and Sam Agnew’s service station at Vallejo St.

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Liaros sold part of his land to the proprietor of the ice plant.

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The building changed hands in 1949.LairosVarietyStorePlansJims

This article mentions that Jim’s Lunchroom is located in the building. If only we could get the Embalmers to come back! Perhaps they could “frolic?”

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The above mentioned variety store, operated at one time by the Polidori family.

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The building was demolished as an eyesore in 1992. Progress!?

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In 1997, a lone California Bay tree stood on the lot, but it was dying.

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The merely functional parking lot in 2008.

Thanks to the Sonoma Valley Historical Society, Stanford University Library Special Collections, and Mr. Lloyd Cripps.

Addendum:

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Document describing the land in Woodleaf Park that Bob Liaros bought in 1931, including the ornamental arch.

 

 

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Architecture, Boyes Hot Springs, History, mid-century, Photographs, Uncategorized

The Corner of Thomson Avenue and Highway 12

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Thomson Avenue, not Thompson Avenue, was named for Dr. Allen Thomson, who had been physician to General Vallejo, and who married one of his granddaughters. Thomson was president of the company that developed the subdivision known as Boyes Springs Park . Thomson Street is its southern border.BHSSubDivBweb

The building at the southeast corner was a Red Crown gas station circa 1930. It later became the Ferrando’s Plumbing building and now houses La Michoacana Ice Cream and Plain Janes. It was famously made over by Rico Martin in 2015.

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The caption says “Questerman/Churchill Garage.” Note the misspelling of the street name and the designation “east.”

Directly across Highway 12 from the end of Thomson (not East Thomson!) was Baker’s Drive In, established in 1957 (and open 24 hours per day!)Baker'sArticleAd In 1958 Norman Baker had big plans to build a truck stop on this property, but the county would not approve the project.BakerTruckStopweb

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Looking South, Farrell’s sign at left, Baker’s Drive In at right.

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Looking at Bakers’ Drive In on Hwy 12, from Thomson. Red Crown building seen at left.

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Looking North

These photos from 1958, courtesy of the Sonoma County Library, were used in a court case, the nature of which is unknown, but could have been a suit over a traffic accident. In the photo of the highway looking south, a sign can be seen (below the Richfield sign) which proclaims Farrell’s Resort, which would have been on the property now partially occupied by Arroyo Vet Hospital.

In 1972, John Metallinos and family opened the Fruit Basket on Arnold Drive.

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They opened their Boyes Springs branch sometime later, probably in the early 1980s, at the old Baker’s Drive In. On June 15, 1983, a fire destroyed that building.FruitBasketFireweb

Nearly a year later, the Boyes Springs Fruit Basket reopened, “in a flourish of live Greek music and dancing,” in its new building, which was designed by architect William Dimick.

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The Fruit Basket in 2107. It really is a graceful building.

My thanks to Mark Maberly for information about Dr. Thomson, and his general enthusiasm for our history. As always, contributions of knowledge are welcomed. Please leave a comment.

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History, Uncategorized

Real Estate

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A “deseño” presented to the Land Claims Commission in support of a claim by Joseph Hooker. (Courtesy, Bancroft Library)

The story of the Springs as we know it, is a story of real estate. And it’s a sometimes confused and confusing story, because it starts after a war and involves many people and many conflicting land claims. But in California before European contact, the native peoples lived for over 10,000 years. You would think that that would give them some ownership rights, but the Spanish saw only empty wilderness, there for the taking. The original people were dispossessed. That deserves our deeper study.

What we call the Springs is a part of the Rancho Agua Caliente, which was the Mexican land grant from 1836 that stretched from Agua Caliente Creek all the way to Glen Ellen. It was originally granted to Ignacio Pachecho, who deemed it unsuitable for farming. Pachecho gave the land back and parts of it passed to Lazaro Piña, M. G. Vallejo, and many others.

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Land Office document showing Ignacio Pachecho’s grant of Rancho Agua Caliente in 1836

One of the earliest chapters involves one Andrew Heoppner, the music teacher to MG Vallejo’s children. In 1846, Vallejo granted Hoeppner 1000 acres of the Rancho to Hoeppner in exchange for music lessons. Hoeppner was the first person to commercialize the hot springs, in 1847. Later, it came into dispute whether Vallejo held title to that land at the time.

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Andrew Hoeppner’s ad in the Daily Alta California for his Annenthal resort, December 8, 1847.

But cloudy titles never slowed down the market in those days.

In 1849, Thaddeus Leavenworth, Mexican war veteran and prominent land swindler in San Francisco, moved to the Rancho, possibly escaping his angry victims in the City.

There he laid claim to 300 acres of land, which encompassed the present day Springs, plus Maxwell Farms. MG Vallejo also claimed this land, so they went to the Land Claims Commission, set up after the war to adjudicate such matters. Leavenworth won, according to historian Robert Parmelee, because he “ had better appearing forged documents…” This was in 1855.

(To make the story even more confusing, Hoeppner was reported to have sold his land to Leavenworth, in 1873!)

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(Courtesy, San Francisco Public Library)

In 1882, along came a pair of innocents by the name of Henry and Antoinette Boyes, English gentry. Wishing to establish themselves in Sonoma Valley, they bought 110 acres of Leavenworth’s claim, without making the most basic check of the title. The land already had several owners, and years of law suits followed. The ending was happy for the Boyes, of course. They went on to establish the resort and town that bear their name, but they didn’t get clear title until the mid 1890s.

 

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Boyes Springs Hotel circa 1909. (Author’s collection)

SUBDIVISIONS

You can’t sell lots without subdivisions. By 1927 there were twenty subdivisions in the Springs, including the town sites of El Verano, Verano, and Agua Caliente.

Boyes Springs A was subdivided and amended 3 times in 1913

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Fetters Springs Terrace

The Oaks Park

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Town of Agua Caliente

Richards Subdivision

Baron’s Villa Tract

Verano Court

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Riverside Addition

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Sonoma Vista Tract

Eaton Park

Creek Front Addition

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This map was titled “Sonoma Valley Resort Map,” showing that the subdivision lots were not seen as being for permanent residences. (Courtesy Robert Parmelee.)

In 1996 a house sold in Boyes Springs A (bounded by Central and Calle del Monte).

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(Courtesy Sonoma County Recorder’s Office.)

It came with a tattered copy of the bill of sale for the land, which reads in part: “This Indenture, made the 17th day of the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eighteen, between Boyes Springs Park Co. Inc. and L B. Richards, that the said party of the first part for and in consideration of the sum of ten dollars gold coin of the United States of America, to it in hand paid by the party of the second part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, has granted bargained, and sold, conveyed and confirmed, and by these presents does grant, bargain and sell, convey and confirm, unto the said party of the second part, and to his heirs and assigns forever all the certain lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the County of Sonoma, State of California, and bounded and particularly described as follows, to-wit: Lot number six in block number twelve, subdivision A in Boyes Springs Park…”  That’s interesting, but imagine the buyer’s disappointment when reading on…

“…the said party of the second part, his heirs, executors and administrators, tenants or persons claiming or occupying under them, or either of them, said land or premisses or any part thereof, shall not use or employ nor directly or indirectly suffer, allow or permit any other person or persons whatever, to use or employ said land or premises or any part thereof, for the purpose of carrying on or conducting any species of card or dice playing, gaming or gambling or an notorious or immoral house, or for any other purpose whatever, except solely and exclusively for the purpose of a private dwelling; or use or employ directly or indirectly suffer, allow or permit any other person or persons whatever to use or employ said lands and premises or an part thereof for the purpose of selling, exchanging, bartering or dealing in spiritous or malt intoxicating liquors, wine or cider, nor for any mercantile or manufacturing business.”

Not even cider! 

This buyer’s happy ending, of course, was, 1996 was just about the bottom of the market.

Another interesting story from the early days has to do with the subdivision known as the Boyes Springs Hotel Grounds. This subdivision entailed all the land around the present day Sonoma Mission Inn from Northside St. on the north to opposite Calle Del Monte on the south, and from the creek to the highway.HotelGrounds1

In 1922, Sam Ganos, a Greek immigrant, bought a lot on the highway, possibly with a building, from the Hotel Corporation. On the recorder’s map, this lot is labeled as “grill.” His restaurant, Sam’s Grill, operated until the 1950’s. In 1923, when the terrible fire swept the valley, Sam saved his building by pouring the waters of the hot springs on it, according to the Index Tribune. The building still stands and now house the Taqueria La Hacienda. This blog published an article about Sam and his building previously. A few years ago, his grandson found it and contacted the author, giving him a deeper knowledge of the family history. Todd Ganos:

“My earliest memory is that of being in the restaurant and looking up at my grandfather.  They also owned the Big 3 grocery store.

“(My dad was born in 1915.) Our old family friend, Gus Kapranas, … told us that my dad’s birth mother was a young waitress that worked for Sam and her name was Clara.  She was born in the US and was supposedly of German and Irish descent.  Gus Kapranas said that Sam refused to marry her and she committed suicide when my dad was a year old or perhaps younger.  Clara’s parents did not want the child and gave my dad to Sam.  According to Gus Kapranas, Sam could not initially care for my dad so he put my dad in an orphanage in San Francisco.  My dad spoke of Father Lawry as the Catholic priest who ran the orphanage…At some point, Sam removed my dad from the orphanage and began to raise my dad himself (with Uncle Gus).  Gus Kapranas said that people objected to a child being raised in a restaurant without a mother.  As a result, Sam, Gus, and my dad moved to Boyes Hot Springs.  I believe the timing would coincide with my dad being about 5 to 7 years old, which would be 1920 to 1922.”

He said that Sam Ganos brought Mendel — his stepson — on board at the restaurant and eventually turned it over to him. He said this occurred in the early  1950s perhaps. He seemed to think that Sam’s Grill was renamed to Mendel’s Cafe at that time.

L. E. “BUD” CASTNER

Real estate man and insurance agent L. E. “Bud” Caster held forth from his office in Boyes Hot Springs for over 50 years. Not incidentally he was a director of the Golden Gate Bridge and Transit District for 40 years, which is the longest tenure of any director.

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L.E. Castner, second from left. (Courtesy Sonoma Valley Historical Society.)

Castner started working life as a logger in Mendocino County, became a doorman in San Francisco, and a collections agent, finally founding his own collection agency. After WWII he moved to Agua Caliente to take up chicken farming, but couldn’t stand the smell. The natural progression was to insurance. (Pause for laugh). He went into business with an established firm in Boyes Hot Springs. Taking over the business when the owner died, he also acquired a partner, Bill Downey, who soon became a judge. Court was held in the back of their building on the highway. Castner leased some of the space in his building to the first doctor, the first dentist, and the first pharmacy in Boyes Hot Springs. (Dr. Michael Makita, Dr. Holly Christenson, and Pine Wagner, pharmacist.) Castner was a Regent of St. Mary’s college in Moraga, which would have been his alma mater if he had graduated. According to Bill Lynch, “The veteran Golden Gate Bridge director was best known for his short fuse, his long friendships, and his devoted service to the bridge district…” L.E. “Bud” Castner died in 1992.

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Bud Casnter’s “new” office, at the corner of Sierra and the Highway, circa 1970s. Now owned by the Sonoma Mission Inn. (Courtesy, Sonoma County Library)

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History, Photographs, Resorts, Uncategorized

Images of America, The Springs:Resort Towns of Sonoma Valley

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Michael Acker’s book will be out on March 27. There will be a book signing at Reader’s Books in Sonoma on March 30, 7PM. Other events to follow including one at the Depot Park Museum, date TBD.

The book features 210 photographs of the Springs from 1885 to 2016. Part history, part nostalgia, part pride of place in the here and now, it is sure to interest and delight residents, visitors, and the curious alike.

Buy it here: https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Products/9781467124300

 

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El Verano, History, Resorts, Uncategorized

Crane’s Hotel/Our Resort/McNeilly’s

First, the confusion.

There was a Crane’s Hotel, and a Crane’s Sanitarium. Cranes Hotel was at the corner of Willow and Verano Avenue, and existed as early as 1908, according to an advertisement in the Press Democrat. Crane’s Sanitarium was “between Boyes Hot Springs and El Verano,” according to an ad they placed in the Index Tribune in 1921, and “Near Verano Station, between Boyes Hot Springs and Sonoma City. Just off the highway,” according to a tourist guidebook from around 1920.

Crane’s Sanitarium was the precursor to Sonoma Valley Hospital (Please see http://www.svh.com/the-evolution-of-sonoma-valley-hospital/.) Crane’s Hotel became Our Resort, then McNeilly’s Tavern. The two establishments, the sanitarium and the resort, were not one and the same.cranesshotelcraneshoteltrees1912Post marked 1912.

An Index Tribune archive search does not turn up much for Crane’s Hotel. The span of years between the first and last mention of Crane’s Hotel is 1908-1916. It became Our Resort sometime after 1916. Rose Pensar is listed as owner in 1924 and mentioned in 1938 as being “of Our Resort.” There is a 1924 Oakland Tribune ad for Our Resort.pressdemo1908craneshotel oaklandtrib1916craneshotelourresortoaklandtrib1924ourresort2webourresort1web

Baseball was very important in Sonoma Valley for many years. In May of 1935, Our Resort hosted The Greyhounds team from San Francisco. In later years, the resort sponsored a softball team that won many local championships.ourresortchampions

Notice that the ad says “Just West of the New Bridge.” The new bridge on Verano Avenue opened on September 17, 1950. The map shows the location of the old bridge and, at the time, proposed new one. After the new bridge was completed, the county tried to sell the old steel trusses, but there were no takers.oldevbridgemapelveranobridge

McNeilly’s opened in February, 1981, with a “new 25 inch color TV,” according to the Index Tribune. The pool table was replaced by a Space Invaders game. The Tavern was still in business, and still sponsoring sports teams, into the 2000s.After it closed, the building was vacant and derelict, and seemed headed for demolition. But, early in 2017, new owners had a new foundation installed, and it appears the structure will be saved, if not “restored.” Tearing off the siding revealed the old “Our Resort” sign. Perhaps that can be preserved as a memorial to the history of the building and the days of the resorts.ourresort2017February 2017

 

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Architecture, History, Jewish History, Now and Then, Resorts, Uncategorized

Rosenthal’s Resort, Part Two

We left off with Selig Rosenthal’s death in 1938. But the story of Rosenthal’s Resort did not end there.doraswedding1939In June of 1939, Dora Rosenthal married Joe Winters, a well-known local tailor.

it1938wintersfirstmentionadwintersoldshop1956Joe Winters’ shop was for many years located next to the El Dorado Hotel. The red and white awning of the Raymond Real Estate office would not get past the Sonoma Design Review Commission now!

Winters was very involved with the rodeo in 1939. The rodeo was started in 1929 and ran through the 1950s, on the Millerick Ranch near Schellville. it1939wintersrodeophoto

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In 1939, National Geographic amgazine came to Sonoma and photographed the Rodeo “Kangaroo Court,” which included Joe Winters.

Winters was a Polish citizen. He applied for dual citizenship in 1940. R.R. Emapran was one of his witnesses. Emparan was the grandson of General Mariano G. Vallejo.winterspolish

In that year Harry Lyons was again partnering to run the resort.

In 1941, “the main building of the Winters resort near Boyes Springs, formerly Rosenthal’s hotel, is being remodeled by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Winters into seven apartments.”

Rental accommodations were in high demand for defense workers at Mare Island. In 1942, the IT reported that many other resorts were being converted for war housing: “Farrell’s, Parente’s, Rosenthal’s, and Maurel Villa used to be popular in the good old summer time, but are now rented to all year round tenants, cottages being especially in demand. Fetters Hot Springs has its share too.”

In 1945 the IT said the Winters had sold their resort and retired to San Francisco. They had actually sold the resort in 1943 to Mrs. Mary Kalivoda, who ran it as Acacia Grove Resort until 1955, when it was sold to A. R. Wilson of El Cerrito.

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Here is another example of the serendipity that happens when you search newspaper archives. On the same page as the item about the new Acacia Grove owners is this photo of Charlie Peluffo’s house being moved. Peluffo was the developer of the Plaza Center Building at the old Boyes plaza site. The house stood where shopping center at Verano Avenue is, and was move to a lot on Lomita Avenue. Is it still there?

The building that houses the Thai restaurant now (2016) was originally a store.

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rosenthalstore-thaiPhoto from 2008 of the Rosenthal Store building, housing E Sann Thai restaurant.

The building was the home of Lee and Lia Chinese restaurant from 1976 to 1987.

As with the Springs in general, the economic downturn that came with the end of the resort era, brought a certain amount of crime associated with Acacia Grove.

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However, positive things were happening also. In 1966 contractro R.A. Lof added a new laundry room and showers.

Jack Weiler bought Acacia Grove in 1971 and his family still owns it in 2017.

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Interesting buildings from the Rosenthal days:rosenthalchickencoopThe chicken coop. Poultry husbandry was common and popular in the Springs in the early 20th Century.rosenthaltankhouse

The resort was served by a well. The water was stored in the tank house, which is a residence today.rosenthallasalletteThis building was La Salette Restaurant for a few years, but has been vacant a long time. What function did it serve in the heyday of the resort? grangehall1930swebgrange2008mural2012web

The Grange Hall in the 1930s, 2008, and 2012.

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